Arts & Literature

Wed
02
Apr

Stories you wouldn’t believe


The cover of “Perils of a Polynesian Percussionist” was hand-drawn by author Meg Corrigan and her grandson Logan Broich, 14. Sitting at the drum set is Todd Barlow, a character inspired by Corrigan herself.

Meg Corrigan of Lake Elmo never aspired to be a drummer, let alone play for a Polynesian revue, but from a young age she had a passion for Hawaiian culture. She played the drums for a traveling Polynesian revue for three years. (Submitted photos)

True events inspire Meg Corrigan’s new novel
Meg Corrigan has a penchant for picking things up.
She never studied to be a writer. She’s only ever taken three months of drum lessons. And yet somehow she’s managed to transform both of those talents into professions.

Mon
10
Mar

‘Buzzard Ball’ puts seniors onstage


Vultures and Vulturettes Brian Joyce, Christine Dornbusch, Michael Oslund (back), Eric Wood, Annie Zimbel, Janet Mondloh, Stu Naber (center), Jerry Hoffman, Judy Hoffman, Mikel Clifford, Shannon Kennedy (front), Helen Donnay (sitting). (submitted photos)

Vultures Brian Joyce and Michael Oslund (top), Eric Wood and Stu Naber (middle), Jerry Hoffman and Shannon Kennedy (bottom).

The senior softball team “The Vultures” are determined to end their three-season losing streak.

Local talent fuels ensemble comedy
There seems to be plenty of stage space for young thespians, from classroom skits to high-school plays and summer camps and programs.
What you don’t often find is a showcase for older actors -- the ones who have enough life experience to portray any character they’re playing to a “T” and are confident enough to push the portrayals to their comedic utmost.

Sat
01
Feb

Larkin Dance Studio continues 64-year legacy at new Maplewood location


The Senior Line class strikes a pose in the larger dance space at their new location. Larkin Dance moved to 1400 E. Hwy 36 in Maplewood. (photos by Linda Baumeister/Review)

The Larkin Dance Senior Line students practice their jumps and lifts.

Jody Eastburn teaches a Babies Ballerinas class at Larkin Dance Studio, larger location at 1400 E. Hwy 36 in Maplewood. More classes are offered at the new location.

The Larkin Dance Senior Line

Georgiann sews leotards in the sewing room filled with colorful fabric and threads.

A memorial bench in the entrance pays tribute to Shirley Larkin, founder of Larkin Dance Studio. Daughters Molly and Michele took over ownership when their mother died two years ago.

A fixture in Maplewood, Larkin Dance Studio now has more room to stretch out.
The family-run business, which for decades has pumped out award-winning dancers who’ve made it to national television, Broadway and films, this month relocated to the building that formerly housed Minnesota Granite and Marble at 1400 E. Highway 36.

Wed
15
Jan

St. Anthony Community Theater presents PlayFest

If you have ever wanted to write, direct or star in your own stage play, now is your chance. The St. Anthony Community Theater will be hosting its first ever PlayFest, where they are inviting teams of two to five people to write and stage a one-act play within 48 hours.
There will be rules each team must follow when writing the play, which will be given to the teams at an organizational meeting, held on Thursday, Jan. 30 at the St. Anthony Village High School auditorium at 7 p.m. Teams will then have 48 hours to write short, one-act plays, which they will perform on stage, starting at 7 p.m.

Tue
14
Jan

Roseville dance troupe rocks audience with Queen


The Midwest Youth Dance Theater rehearses for their original performance, “Somebody to Love,” which will debut at the Drew Fine Arts Center at Hamline University Jan. 17 and 18. (photos by Heather Edwards/Review)

Dancers in the performance range from age 9-18.

For listeners, the songs of “Queen” conjure images of football rallies and stadium concerts. But this week, the music of Queen will be combined with dance: modern, jazz and even ballet.
The Midwest Youth Dance Theater (MYDT) of Roseville will premiere their original performance, entitled “Somebody to Love,” at the Drew Fine Arts Center Hamline University 1530 Taylor Avenue St. Paul, St. Paul. Performances will be held Jan. 17 and 18.

Wed
11
Dec

Making art from ashes—yes, those ashes


The first official piece of Eternal Ware was made with the ashes of Carole’s mother, Helen Gurnon, who passed away last year. Her name is inscribed on the bottom of the memorial. (Linda Baumiester/Review)

Carole and Ron Javner work with nationally-known artists through Eternal Ware, creating beautiful, one-of-a-kind memorials using loved ones’ cremains. (Linda Baumiester/Review)

When people make preparations for what happens after they die, the big questions are burial or cremation. From there, they’ll have to debate: monument or marker? Urn or scattered ashes?
Becoming a piece of art may not be the first thought to come to mind.
However, cremains art is a growing trend among those looking for a non-traditional burial method.

 

Sat
07
Dec

Embrace the warmth of a good book

Looking for a holiday gift with a Minnesota connection?

Jill Yanish • Pamela O’meara
Review staff

Or perhaps you’re searching for good reading on a cold winter day. Grab a mug of hot chocolate and curl up on the couch with one of these recently published books with local ties.

Wed
20
Nov

‘Whistle Down the Wind’ premieres at St. Mark’s


In “Whistle Down the Wind,” three children (Mason Wold, Riley Ebner and Ellie Peterson) find a man (Andy Peterson) in their barn and mistake him for a Messiah. (photos by Heather Edwards/Review)

“Whistle Down the Wind” is set in a small Southern town during the late 1950s. The town is disrupted when a fugitive is found hiding in a barn.

For most people, the name Andrew Lloyd Webber is associated with Broadway hits such as  “Phantom of the Opera” and “Cats“.  However, among Webber ‘s plays is a lesser -known, beautifully haunting musical called  “Whistle Down the Wind,” and St. Mark’s Lutheran Church in North St. Paul is currently presenting it.

Wed
20
Nov

Local authors share the secrets of success


Local authors Meg Corrigan and Gloria VanDemmeltraadt are included in a recently released collection of stories entitled “Unlocking the Secrets of Success: Minnesota Women Share Tips and Strategies for Achieving Your Goals and Living Your Dreams.” (photo and video by Johanna Holub/Review staff)

One woman’s dream is another’s nightmare. But through it all, the Minnesota women featured in the recently released collection “Unlocking the Secrets of Success: Minnesota Women Share Tips and Strategies for Achieving Your Goals and Living Your Dreams” have persevered.
Joan Kennedy, 91, of New Brighton gathered the stories of 40 women working in a variety of professions to create a collection of success stories, ranging from tales of professional success to personal triumphs.

Mon
11
Nov

Murder at the Museum - or Who killed Agatha Marple?


Artifacts have been missing and the body of Agatha Marple, head curator, is discovered at the museum, now a carefully crafted crime scene mystery. Attendees often took photos of themselves near the police tape body outline. (photos by Linda Baumeister/Review)

Lizabeth Doherty and Kelcey Kryzer get into CSI costume for the photo booth before getting into sleuth mode to solve the crime during a social science event.

As well as becoming crime scene investigators, the visitors, including Chase Robeck, also had the chance to access the museum’s other exhibits at a leisurely pace.

A crowd gathers at one of six evidence activity stations set up throughout the Science Museum for Murder at the Museum Oct. 3.

Denny and Annie Lynard venture out to the Science Museum of Minnesota to cover the social science Murder at the Museum Oct. 3.

Some days its best to take a break from the perplexity of the unsolved tales of murdered or missing wives and girlfriends in our metro area and go try to solve a pretend one instead. So I invited my younger daughter for an evening out to crack a murder mystery at the Science Museum of Minnesota in downtown St. Paul.

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